Blog — Origens Brasil

Hot Peppers Are a Way of Life for This Brazilian Indigenous Community

Posted by Gregory Prang on

Hot Peppers Are a Way of Life for This Brazilian Indigenous Community

Another great article by Nick Gill in Saveur about the Baniwa, their culinary culture heritage, and their connection to the contemporary world of gastronomy. "Spanning from orange to green to yellow to purple, 80 distinct pepper varieties are cultivated by the Baniwa, a people who have lived in small settlements in northwestern Brazil's Içana River basin for thousands of years." https://www.saveur.com/in-brazils-icana-river-basin-petite-fiery-chiles-provide-sustainable-income/?bOt5GqRDAh32d7tq.01&fbclid=IwAR3yfsSJTib82Px8AC7yc3UWKxzoOKs2JLO6fpdyDmT_owZoJSYPFYX0bww  

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Announcing our partnership with Origens Brasil®

Posted by Gregory Prang on

Announcing our partnership with Origens Brasil®
Culinary Culture Connections is proud to announce that 2 of our products, Pimenta Baniwa and Yanomami Mushrooms, will be sold with the Origens Brasil® (Brazil Origins) seal. The Origens Brasil® program was developed through a partnership of IMAFLORA and the Instituto Socioambiental (Socioenvironmental Institute - ISA) and is administered by IMAFLORA.

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The women behind Baniwa Jiquitaia Pepper

Posted by Gregory Prang on

The women behind Baniwa Jiquitaia Pepper

Between 2012 and 2017, 20,000 jars of Baniwa Jiquitaia Pepper were sold. The money is passed on, in full, to the families that do the work and the administrators of the Casas da Pimenta Network.

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“What the Forest has” (Part II): Culinary Exploration in Brazilian Territories of Socio-Environmental Diversity

Posted by Gregory Prang on

“What the Forest has” (Part II): Culinary Exploration in Brazilian Territories of Socio-Environmental Diversity

On Saturday, August 5, the “What the forest has” extravaganza at the Pinheiros Market in São Paulo offered tasting sessions organized around three Territories of Socio-Environmental Diversity from 3 biomes: The Rio Xingu basin, Vale do Ribeira (quilombolas) in São Paulo, and the Rio Negro Basin. Below we summarize the discoveries we made that day. Culinary Culture Connections hopes to introduce many of the products offered in the tastings in the near future. The Rio Xingu Basin Xingu Territories of Socio-Environmental Diversity (Source: https://www.socioambiental.org/pt-br/noticias-socioambientais/populacoes-tradicionais-da-amazonia-exigem-gestao-conjunta-de-territorios) First was a tasting of foods originating from the Xingu River basin, representing two regions: the Xingu Indigenous Park in...

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